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For the Church: womanhood and sola scriptura

Many of you have enjoyed the insights and wisdom of Jessalyn Hutto, a Credo Magazine contributor, the author of Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb, and the wife of a church planting pastor, and the mother of four young children. Today her voice can be heard at For The Church, which exists to engage, encourage, and equip the Church with gospel-centered resources that are pastoral, practical, and devotional.

Jessalyn’s article is titled, “A Wise Woman Builds Her Home on Sola Scriptura.” She begins,

Laura Ingalls Wilder is known for making the observation that “home” is the nicest word there is. Indeed, there is an inherent beauty and sweetness to the idea of home that can almost be felt in the sound of the word itself. Surely this is because that lovely place of shelter, comfort, belonging, and becoming that we call home finds its fullest actualization in our God who is himself inherently hospitable. He is the ransomed sinner’s very home. So it is that as we seek to provide an echo of that hospitality in our own families through the artful cultivation of the home, the warmth of his love is channeled through us, spilling out onto all who are welcomed under our roofs. …

Read the rest of Jessalyn’s article today at For the Church.

If you want to learn more about Sola Scriptura, read the following issue of Credo Magazine which is devoted to that formal principle of the Reformation.

Read as a PDF

Protestantism today faces a crisis in authority. Living in the twenty-first century means we are born into a world that has experienced the full effects of the Enlightenment, Protestant Liberalism, and Postmodernism. Yet at the same time, God’s Word continues to stand undefeated. No doubt, the Bible is under fire today as critics, both secular and evangelical (oddly enough), attack the Bible’s full authority. But if we’ve learned anything from the sixteenth-century Reformation, we know that God’s Word will prevail in the end.

As he stood there trembling at the Diet of Worms, certainly it must have seemed to Martin Luther that the whole world was against him. Yet Luther could boldly stand upon the authority of God’s Word because he knew that not even his greatest nemesis was a match for the voice of the living God.

While our circumstances may differ today, the need to recover biblical authority in the church and in the culture remains. The next generation of Christians need to be taught, perhaps for the first time, that this is no ordinary book we hold in our hands. It is the very Word of God. In other words, if Christians today are to give an answer for the faith within them against those who would criticize the scriptures, then they need to be taught the formal principle of the Reformation: sola Scriptura—only Scripture, because it is God’s inspired Word, is our inerrant, sufficient, and final authority for the church.

Contributors include Justin Holcomb, Gavin Ortlund, Robert Kolb, Chris Castaldo, Paul House, and many others.

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