Was Christianity an invention of the 4th and 5th centuries? Is orthodox theology merely the byproduct of power struggles, so that whoever has the political upper hand decides what is heretical? Is the high view of Jesus really a minority view in the first two centuries of the church? Executive editor, Matthew Barrett, talks with Michael Kruger to answer some of these popular questions and objections.

Michael J. Kruger (Ph.D., University of Edinburgh) is President and the Samuel C. Patterson Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte, NC.  He is one of the leading scholars today in the study of the origins of the New Testament, particularly the development of the New Testament canon and the transmission of the New Testament text. He is the author of numerous books including The Gospel of the Savior (Brill, 2005), The Heresy of Orthodoxy (Crossway, 2010, with Andreas Köstenberger), Canon Revisited (Crossway, 2012), The Question of Canon (IVP, 2013), and Christianity at the Crossroads:  How the Second Century Shaped the Future of the Church (SPCK, 2017; IVP Academic, 2018). He is also the editor of and contributor to A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament (Crossway, 2016) and co-editor of The Early Text of the New Testament (Oxford, 2012) and Gospel Fragments (Oxford, 2009). Dr. Kruger is ordained in the Presbyterian Church in America and also serves (part-time) as Pastor of Teaching at Uptown PCA in downtown Charlotte. You can follow his blog at www.michaeljkruger.com or on Twitter @michaeljkruger.