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New Credo Podcast: Saving Hermeneutics from Its Interpreters

How should we interpret, preach, and apply the Scriptures? What are the challenges historical criticism and postmodernism pose to the unity of the Bible? How does the unity between the testaments oscillate on the person and work of Jesus Christ? How is the Christ event eschatological? What is the rule of faith and how should it function in our interpretation of scripture?

In this episode, Matthew Barrett talks with Craig Bartholomew about hermeneutics and the unity of Scripture.

Craig G. Bartholomew

Craig G. Bartholomew (PhD, University of Bristol) is the Director of the Kirby Laing Institute for Christian Ethics and Senior Research Fellow at Tyndale House, Cambridge. Formerly, he was Senior Research Fellow at the University of Gloucestershire as well as the H. Evan Runner Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Religion and theology at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Canada. Bartholomew is the author and editor of numerous books including The Drama of Scripture: Finding Our Place in the Biblical Story, Introducing Biblical Hermeneutics: A Comprehensive Framework for Hearing God in Scripture, Old Testament Wisdom Literature: A Theological Introduction, Excellent Preaching: Proclaiming the Gospel in Its Context and Ours, and Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms: Ecclesiastes.

Matthew Barrett

Matthew Barrett is Associate Professor of Christian Theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including Canon, Covenant and Christology: Rethinking Jesus and the Scriptures of Israel; None Greater: The Undomesticated Attributes of God; 40 Questions About SalvationGod’s Word Alone: The Authority of ScriptureReformation Theology: A Systematic SummarySalvation by Grace, and Owen on the Christian LifeHe is the host of the Credo podcast where he engages top theologians on the most important theological issues today.

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