By Paul Helm This is the last of three posts on theological connections between medieval and reformed theology. The Reformation was a re-formation, not a revolution, and the Reformed churches regarded themselves as catholic, building on the ecumenical creeds and the patristic and medieval theology, and paying great respect to the great doctors of the…

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The countdown continues to the release of the first issue of Credo Magazine this October. This October’s issue, The Living Word, will feature articles and interviews with theologians like Timothy George, John Frame, Gregg Allison, Robert Saucy, Owen Strachan, Fred Zaspel, Tim Challies, Matthew Barrett, Tony Merida, Michael A.G. Haykin, Thomas Schreiner, and many others.…

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This morning we launched the new website for Credo Magazine. I would like to thank Micah Fries for his work on this project. We hope you enjoy the improved site and some of its new features. We have noticed, however, that the website seems to work best in Firefox (if you are using Internet Explorer…

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On the “Reviews and Interviews” page Luke Stamps reviews Daniel Ebert’s new book, Wisdom Christology: How Jesus Becomes God’s Wisdom for Us.  Luke begins, “Wisdom and Christology belong together” (2). This juxtaposition is one of the primary assumptions of Daniel Ebert’s new book, Wisdom Christology: How Jesus Becomes God’s Wisdom for Us.  Ebert, a former…

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Wayne Grudem is research professor of theology and biblical studies at Phoenix Seminary in Phoenix, Arizona. Aaron Cline Hanbury has taken the time to ask Grudem some questions about his book, Politics – According to the Bible (Zondervan, 2010). What got you started on this project? The theological reason is that I think God’s Word…

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By Michael A.G. Haykin Not long after his conversion, William Wilberforce (1759–1833), at the time a member of Parliament, wrote to the evangelical minister John Newton (1725–1807) on December 2, 1785, wanting to visit him for spiritual advice about his career, for Wilberforce was contemplating leaving the realm of politics. For a number of eighteenth-century…

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This week’s winner for the book package giveaway is…Matthew George! Matthew George, you have won the following books: Understanding the Times: New Testament Studies in the 21st Century: Essays in Honor of D. A. Carson on the Occasion of His 65th Birthday, edited by Andreas J. Kostenberger and Robert W. Yarbrough. Did Adam and Eve…

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By Matthew Barrett “Ever since I was little,” says Hiroki Terai, Tokyo’s pioneering divorce planner, “I wondered, If you have a wedding ceremony, why not have one to mark your divorce?” Described as a “man of good cheer” Terai has created a rave of interest in Tokyo Japan for ceremonies celebrating one’s divorce. Paige Ferrari…

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By Marc Cortez [The following is the opening devotional that I presented at the NW regional meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, 2011.] What are we doing here? I’m sure we could walk out this building and, within five minutes, find any number of hurting people desperately in need of care and attention, longing for…

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by Matthew Barrett Today I will begin a series of posts where I will be blogging through Thomas Schreiner’s new book, 40 Questions About Christians and Biblical Law (Kregel). In my own experience, Christians are often times confused when it comes to understanding what the Bible teaches about biblical law and how it impacts them…

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by Matthew Barrett The incarnation of Christ is a marvelous mystery. How is it that Christ is one person, yet two natures? Truly this is supernatural. I love how John Owen, puritan divine of the highest caliber, describes the person of Christ: “Each nature operates in him according unto its essential properties. the divine nature…

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by Luke Stamps “The providence of God is like Hebrew words—it can be read only backwards.” This is an oft-quoted line from the Puritan John Flavel, but it bears repeating.  Of course, Flavel is referring to the fact that the Hebrew language is read backwards from our perspective–that is, right to left instead of left to…

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